Archive for April, 2010

A Note from Eric Snow!

Posted in Letters from the Speaker on April 15, 2010 by nsnatlmktg

I enjoyed sharing my ideas on leadership at the National Sales Network Atlanta Chapter meeting last month.  I thought the event was terrific and the audience was great.  They were very professional, very knowledgeable and engaging.  It was obvious that this group was sincerely interested in discovering ways to improve their leadership capabilities and become better people.  Their theme of strong personal development is definitely a path that could lead them up the corporate ladder.

NSN is a great organization that is committed to helping professionals succeed in the business world.  I was very impressed with the event and hope that I am invited back next year or able to attend other NSN leadership events across the country.

P.S.

For those of you who were unable to attend the event, my new book is available for sale at Amazon.com or by clicking this link:  http://www.amazon.com/Leading-High-Performers-Ultimate-Flexible/dp/1600377181/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&s=books&qid=1260415552&sr=8-1

To contact about future engagements, please reach out to bookings@ascendantstrategy.net or 336-575-3594. 

Thank you for the opportunity.

Eric Snow

Eric Snow: Leading High Performers

Posted in Event Recaps on April 6, 2010 by nsnatlmktg

Last month’s meeting was a success! Eric Snow, 14-year NBA veteran turned author, was our dynamic guest speaker.  Mr. Snow provided some helpful tips to becoming a fast, flexible, and fluid leader and managing conflict using relevant analogies from his long, experienced career in the NBA.  Following are highlights from the  workshop.

SESSION I: STEPS TO BECOMING A FAST, FLUID AND FLEXIBLE LEADER

What Makes a Great Leader? Experience

  1. Leadership is the process you go through in reaching your personal goal, then helping others achieve a goal.
  2. Leaders have a genuine concern about the success of others.
  3. Great leaders have the ability to get their own agenda out of the way.

4 STEPS TO BEING A FAST LEADER:

  1. Know your strategy inside and out and plan for all contingencies. Know your principles very well so if adjustment is necessary, you can adjust quickly. 
  2. Project decisiveness and unwavering confidence.
  3. Motivate team players to accept changes in the team environment as they occur.
  4. Recognize the world today is different and changes rapidly; be willing to adapt.

6 P’S TO BEING A MORE FLUID LEADER:

“Fluid Leaders don’t just ‘go with the flow’- They ‘create’ the flow”

  1. Planning– Be prepared and equipped for all challenges that come with leading high achievers and WINNING with a high achiever on your team.
  2. Priorities– Immediately establish the value of positive character along with team discipline.
  3. Progress– Continue to have a good work ethic even when you don’t see the results you want.
  4. Perseverance– Push through obstacles when they occur.
  5. Patience-Be mindful success is coming but you have to be patient, not only with your success, but also with those you are dealing with.
  6. Partnership– Understand you are helping someone else even when you don’t think you are.

5 Steps of Being a Flexible Leader:

Leaders know every key position and are poised to play them when needed in order to achieve success.

  1. Communication – This is your Point Guard position.
  2. Action – Shooting Guard position.  Go out and take extra steps
  3. Balance – Best all around position.  Always have equal balance from physical, mental, social and emotional aspect. 
  4. Anchor – Center of foundation.
  5. Dependable – Power Forward position.  Walk into the room and command response without even speaking.

SESSION II: MANAGING CONFLICT

During this session, audience members were allowed to give examples of conflicts experienced in the work place related to gender bias, race bias and egos and Eric Snow gave insightful tips on how to effectively manage those conflicts.  Following are some of Eric’s insights:

One of the biggest challenges we face in the workplace and our personal lives is handling difficult situations and people.  In order to manage conflict that occurs with others, you have to know how you will handle difficult situations yourself.

Good mentorship is the key. People who have been in similar situations can see from a certain perspective effectively. Now you can have a great defined plan to get through these certain situation as they occur.

 At the end of the day, there has to be “one common goal”: The team goal. What is the team goal? Don’t hurt the team because of one bad player.

5 Steps to Managing Conflict:

  1. Communicate using direct and easy language (where people can relate to you).
  2. Communicate using concepts where people can really embrace what you are saying. “You need to ignite their passion”
  3. “Be accountable” and “hold yourself accountable”
  4. Be a “learner” and a “doer”.  You are always learning and doing. Develop and improve procedures that will relate to your goal.
  5. Keep the “big picture” in mind.

FINAL THOUGHTS: THE VALUES OF A POINT GUARD

  • Show people you care about them as a person. Show that it is not agenda driven.
  • Know personalities. Know how to relate to people, how they respond and how they are personality driven.
  • Represent what you say. Don’t tell someone to do what you aren’t willing to do. When they see you doing it, they will be willing to follow.
  • Sacrifice. Are you willing to sacrifice for the team even if someone else gets the recognition for your hard work?
  • If you’re stuck in a difficult situation with someone else, you can be sure they are stuck as well.
  • You cannot change others, but you can change the way you think.

As you can see, Eric Snow armed us with helpful, applicable information that can be immediately used in our daily lives.  For more detailed perspective, pick up Eric Snow’s new book, Leading High Performers: The Ultimate Guide to Being a Fast, Fluid and Flexible Leader, available at Amazon.com. 

You can also check out Eric Snow’s website at http://www.leadhighperformers.com/